Paper #6. Advanced Analysis is a Mindset.

Jeffrey S. Johnson, Colonel, USAF (ret.) Since 9/11 intelligence analysis and its shortcomings have been widely discussed.  Military Services increased the amount of training in critical thinking and structured analytic techniques. The Army and Air Force created Advanced Analysis courses and OUSD(I) created the Information Environment Advanced Analysis course. All of this is good for moving toward the goal of improving the skill sets and capabilities of military intelligence analysts. But, more fundamental to an increase in courses and techniques, what is required to achieve a breakthrough in advanced analysis is a new or renewed mindset and an environment created to execute advanced analysis.

Continue reading

Note #10. Information – Related Capabilities and Effects.

Thomas A. Drohan, Ph.D. Information-Related Capabilities abound in doctrine-approved professional communities of practice. Unfortunately, doctrine always lags reality. Especially reality that takes the form of a proactive competitor. We tend to label such intellectually self-imposed surprises as black swans. 

Continue reading

Note #9. Understanding Iran on its Own Terms.

Ron Machoian, Ph.D. Note #8, “Mirror Imaging Iran and the World,” (3 July 2019) brings the sub-field of strategic culture to the forefront of today’s anxious discussion of how best to coerce the Islamic Republic of Iran (IRI) into cooperation with international norms of state behavior. Drohan points out that in seeking “balance” in Iran’s internal spheres of power, we may be projecting onto Iran the characteristics of our own self-image, where our political world, at least by design, remains balanced in a number of manners.  

Continue reading

Note # 8. Mirror Imaging Iran and the World.

Thomas A. Drohan, Ph.D. We tend to mirror image our competitors by using clock-world analogies that apply less and less to today’s cloud-world. Especially in the information environment, where the clock-like physical determinism critiqued by Karl Popper is notso relevant.

Continue reading